Tag Archives: Management

It’s Motivation Monday with Kelly Swanson

Do Women Have to Be Mean to Succeed in Business?

I think that somewhere along the way, some women got this idea that in order to succeed they had to be aggressive, mean, and out for themselves – that touchy feely, heartsy, lets all join hands and do this together, just wasn’t going to cut it in business.

And some women got the idea that being confident, aggressive, bold, and competitive is too mean. And women are supposed to be nice. It’s in the rule book.

I’d like to suggest that there is a happy place in the middle of pompously self-absorbedand take my job I don’t need it as much as you do.  I’d like to suggest that you can have a bold opinion, outsell your competitor, dominate in your industry, and still be likeable, humble, respected and even revered.

I’d like to suggest to all you really mean women out there, that aside from the fact that you are making enemies, you probably aren’t winning as much business as you could.

I’d like to suggest to all of you overly nice women out there, that it doesn’t have to be all give and no take. You are allowed to have a strong opinion. You are allowed to know what makes you better than your competitor. You are allowed to be proud of your achievements and accomplishments and to always be striving for higher.

I’d like to suggest that we as women take a look around and see how we’re doing at really helping and encouraging and supporting each other – and yet also taking a look around and seeing how well we are doing about owning our own gifts, stepping into our jobs with confidence, being bold and taking business that we have worked hard to get.

Then again – it’s just a suggestion. Probably not even heard by the ones who need to hear it most.

I’m just saying.

Kelly SwansonKELLY SWANSON is an award-winning storyteller, comedian, author, motivational speaker. She has been described by Our State Magazine as one of North Carolina’s funniest women. She uses hilarious comedy, powerful stories, and a wacky cast of southern characters to make people laugh, remind them of their value, and show them how to stand up and stick out in their lives, businesses, and communities. Her shows have delighted audiences from coast to coast, from board rooms to cruise ships. To invite Kelly to your 2014 event, contact Sue Falcone at sue@simplysuespeaks.com or call 1-888-766-3155.

Stop Wasting Your Time and Learn to Delegate

Article Reblogged from Entrepreneur.com

stop-wasting-time-learn-delegateWhen you’re an entrepreneur, your business is like your baby. Delegating or outsourcing tasks can sometimes be difficult because no one can do things as well as you. Right?

Wrong, says Jordan Cohen, a productivity expert at PA Consulting Group, a London-based management consulting firm: “At some point, every entrepreneur will hit a point where they can’t do any more and do it well,” he says.

In a study for Harvard Business Review, Cohen and Julian Birkinshaw, a professor of strategy and entrepreneurship at London Business School, interviewed executives at 39 companies in the United States and Europe and found that 41precent of their day was filled with activities that could be competently handled by others.

“We’ve been socialized with the idea that completing a task is an accomplishment,” says Cohen. “But in today’s business world, an entrepreneur’s time can be better served by doing the tasks that matter most to the success of their business and delegating the rest.”

Finding the right people and trusting them with your brand can feel risky. Cohen offers these three easy steps to become a better delegator:

1. Put outsourcing infrastructure in place before it’s needed. 
Entrepreneurs often look for help when they’re time crunched or overwhelmed, but this is not the best time to find an outsourcing option, says Cohen. Instead of making decisions under stress, research good alternatives for delegating or outsourcing before you need them. For example, train staff members to take over new tasks, or find and interview consultants that you can call upon when needed.

“The more time you are able to invest in setting up your options, the more robust the solution will be,” says Cohen.

2. Put delegating on your calendar. 
When you review your calendar and to do list, Cohen says to look at meetings and tasks with a critical eye.

“What tasks do you have to do yourself and what could you have others do?” asks Cohen. Tasks that have low value for your customers and are time-consuming — such as bookkeeping or administrative tasks — are ideal tasks to outsource.

“You are in the best position to determine what you have to do,” says Cohen. “Use good judgment, but don’t get caught up in a way of working that isn’t productive.”

3.Then test the waters. 
Once you identify tasks that are good for outsourcing, start small. Cohen suggests starting with something that isn’t complex or urgent. Instead, experiment with low importance things. For example, hire a graphic design firm to turn your presentation into a PowerPoint presentation — but don’t start with your most important sales pitch.

“Things rarely work perfectly the first time,” he says. “The idea is to get comfortable with delegating. It takes practice, but it gets easier over time.”

 

Stephanie Vozza is a freelance writer who has written about business, real estate and lifestyle for more than 20 years.

Image Credit: lifehacker.com

 

It’s Motivation Monday with Kelly Swanson

meetingsIt’s Motivation Monday and a time for celebrating the life and legacy of a transformational leader-Dr. Martin Luther King. How are you celebrating today? Thanks for joining us as Kelly shares all about meetings!

Meetings Are Killing Motivation and Participation

I have this “friend” (I’ll call her Beth) who stepped up to serve in a local community organization that will remain nameless. She agreed to serve despite her already filled schedule, because of their desperate plea for volunteers. Apparently they had already burned out the other volunteers and were desperate for new meat.

Beth knew that they held one event a month, and while it would be tough, she would make it happen. What they didn’t tell her was that for every activity they planned, they would have at least five meetings to accompany it. Not even three months later and Beth is rocking back and forth, considering a restraining order, and wondering how hard it would be to fake her own death. It wasn’t the work that killed her, it was the meetings.

The number one complaint I hear from businesses, companies, groups, committees, associations,  and volunteer organizations that I have been involved with, is how hard it is to get people to step up and help, even when it involves their career and volunteer spirit. They complain about how a small group does all the work and they are burned out.

I think there are many reasons like a lack luster vision that is poorly communicated, people who are given tasks instead of made to feel empowered by their own ideas, a strong desire to accomplish items on a list even though they are outdated and completely irrelevant to today’s society, the belief that more is better, and political struggles for power.

But one main reason is the MEETINGS. People are stressed and they are busy, and they most certainly do not like their time wasted. And taking them away from their families and other work obligations for a “tiny little meeting” is a big deal, even if you do promise them dinner. And most people walk away from these meetings wondering why they even met when all of this could have been covered in one email with a little advance planning.

As much as we might hate to admit it, technology has changed the way we function in our world. And while it is important to maintain that face-to-face, it doesn’t mean you have to schedule endless meetings that could have been accomplished in an email. The world will not end if you don’t meet over chicken wings. And no matter how important you think that meeting is, requiring your people to show up once a week or more, is something that will drain their energy and enthusiasm and cause them to leave or perform poorly.

Just ask Beth.

Kelly SwansonKELLY SWANSON is an award-winning storyteller, comedian, author, motivational speaker. She has been described by Our State Magazine as one of North Carolina’s funniest women. She uses hilarious comedy, powerful stories, and a wacky cast of southern characters to make people laugh, remind them of their value, and show them how to stand up and stick out in their lives, businesses, and communities. Her shows have delighted audiences from coast to coast, from board rooms to cruise ships. To invite Kelly to your 2014 event, contact Sue Falcone at sue@simplysuespeaks.com or call 1-888-766-3155.