Tag Archives: culture

Leadership Through Change

The modern workplace has significant levels of stress. It can also be immersed with conflict related to change-management and downsizing. Technological change can cause conflict, as can changing work methodologies. Sometimes change would come in the form of a new boss. Someone coming in with new ideas and new methodologies. Just reorganization alone, which is some workplaces tends to be almost chronic, leads to tremendous amounts of stress and conflict.

While leadership is about change, change causes anxiety to many. In some instances, nothing is worse to productivity that extreme and disturbing anxiety in the workplace. This is when people constantly focus on their sources of anxiety (job loss, loss of power, loss of advantages) rather than on their own productivity and the success of the company overall.

Change interferes with autonomy and can make people feel that they’ve lost control over their territory and power. It also creates excess uncertainty. If change feels extremely uncertain, then people will reject it. People will often prefer to remain in misery than to head toward an unknown. In life in general, as much as in the workplace, we all need a sense of safety. Oftentimes with change, much unknown creates much irritability.

Leadership Definition – How it Connects to Change

Leadership is defined as the act of leading a group or organization. But sometimes leadership is faced with challenges in the face of change. Any decisions that imposed on people suddenly will cause anxiety and distress.

Everything seems different. Routine, as much as complained upon, brings certainty and confidence to many. Sudden decisions will create much bitterness and talk in the hallways.

In departing from the past and moving towards newer regulations, many will worry about loss of respect, face and status. Perhaps there are things that they do not really know. Maybe there are things they are not really good at. Things that were sort of protected by the older regulations. The concern would be that the newer regulations may expose inadequacies or incompatibilities.

Change also brings up concerns of being able to adapt to the newer requirements. Especially with technology, those that are not as technologically savvy may take longer to learn and feel extremely intimidated and agitated.

Many will worry that more will be required of them and are not sure how.

Leadership & Change – Getting Past Resentments

Resentments will come in two major forms: past resentments and present resentments.

Past resentments are sometimes staying put and quiet as long as everything is steady. But once anxiety is up, and things are steady no longer, these old resentments may surface again. The older they are, they may be harder to resolve. New resentments may arise stemming from the newly created circumstances.

Oftentimes, when older generation employees feel threatened by newer generation, and feel that their knowledge and experienced are not valued or may not be valued in the newly created circumstances.

The threat of change and the anxiety it causes are more than understandable. Change is promising to some, vital to the organization, dangerous to others. Because of that, change requires proactive conflict management practices. This is done in order to prevent escalation of conflict through change.

How to Lead Through Change

Here are some effective tips for leaders on successfully working through organizational change, without unnecessary drama:

1. Engage and Involve:

People tend to comply much more readily and easily if they feel a sense of ownership. This is rather than them feeling that things are imposed on them. While clearly change IS imposed on the employees, it would be a good idea to engage them in the process. And, to provide them with as much information and rationale as possible. This is in order to give them a sense of ownership rather than risk a sense of resentment.

2. Communicate, and Be Available to be Communicated With:

To keep your employees engaged, motivated and focused in a change-saturated environment, you will need to make yourself more available. This is good for you. As a leader you want to be able to monitor first-hand how things are managed under the organizational changes so that you can react quickly and effectively, and nip disasters in the bud. It is also good for your employees. They will have questions, and they will need clarity. The worst possible situation for an employee in a change saturated environment is to feel that there is no one to talk to other than water cooler talk with other employees.

3. Clarify Roles and Rules:

There is no difference between bigger and smaller corporations when it comes to low levels of clarity in terms of the scope of employees’ work or company policies. Regardless of the size of your organization, a lack of clarity will always lead to conflict.

The rule of thumb when it comes to employees’ scope of work and to company policies is “detail, detail, detail.” Detail aids clarity. In every situation where things are defined in a vague or partially vague manner there are problems. Messages are open not only to interpretation, but also to negotiation and power struggles. This isn’t because employees are necessarily trying to allocate more power to themselves. This may very well be the case, but it’s not always. But, because employees may truly make different assumptions as far as the scope of their work goes, what the policies are, and what is expected of them.

When their perceptions of expectations, scope, and policies clash, they will interpret that clash in a personal manner. Then conflict becomes inevitable. After all, when employees are unsure of what is expected of them, how can they be expected to perform in the best possible way? They can’t. That is why detail and clarity are so important.

4. Be Clear to Battle Fear

In departing from the past and moving toward newer regulations, many will worry about loss of respect, face, and status. One example of this could be a lack of skill or knowledge. This lack may perhaps be protected or hidden by older regulations. An employee may fear that these inadequacies or incompatibilities are about to be exposed.

Similarly, change also brings concerns of being able to adapt to the new requirements. This is especially true with technology. Those that are not as technologically savvy may take longer to learn new systems. They may feel extremely intimidated and agitated. Many will also worry that more will be required of them once the new changes are in place, and they are not sure how to meet those requirements.

The threat of change and the anxiety it causes are more than understandable. Change is promising to some, and perhaps vital to the organization. But, it’s dangerous to others. Because of that, change requires proactive conflict-management practices. In other words, management need to prevent conflict before it escalates. The Red-Shift Blue-Shift model, which we will talk about in greater detail later on, aims to do exactly that.

This model assists organizations in creating a language of effective conflict management. It does this throughout the organization during times of change or turmoil. It’s done in order to proactively address conflicts when they are still small, to increase engagement, and to create a company culture of true teamwork.

5. Promote a Company Culture of Adaptability- and Demonstrate It Yourself

To do well as a leader within your company and to build an adaptable team, you need to be able to accomplish five things. For the most part, what that means is that you need to create a corporate culture that recognizes the opportunity in every challenge.

As you accompany and support your employees through organizational change, remember that change related challenges are opportunities for growth. Highlight that in every conversation, meeting and communication. And furthermore, don’t forget to believe in it yourself, truly and whole-heartedly.

Dr. Michelle Rozen, International Keynote Speaker, Change Expert and Author, is a highly influential Social Media Expert, and featured on NBC, ABC, CNN, FOX News and many other media outlets discussing change, motivation and how the human mind works to become exceptional in every area of our lives, professionally and personally. Dr. Michelle Rozen is one of the most sought after International and National Keynote Speakers!  Book Dr. Michelle today: https://bit.ly/34QbHPv

Develop Differently-Abled Employees: No-Excuses Leadership

Develop Differently-Abled Employees: No-Excuses Leadership

By Doug Lipp

Sandra, the factory employee I’m observing, works tirelessly and methodically at her station.

Reaching into a large cardboard box filled with hundreds of teabags, Sandra pulls out enough bags to fill tea-bag-sized indentations in a tray situated in front of her on the workbench. Once she fills each indentation—15 for this job — she carefully transfers the teabags from the tray into a smaller box destined for supermarket shelves.

Over and over during her shift, Sandra accurately fills the smaller boxes with the consistency and reliability of a computer-controlled robot … yet she is blind, cannot hear, and cannot count.

Sandra is blessed to work for an organization called Pride Industries. Founded in a church basement in 1966 in Auburn, California, Pride Industries hires and trains people with a variety of physical and mental challenges, the “differently-abled” in our society.  Using massively creative training programs, Pride Industries helps turn an often ignored group of people into purpose-driven, contributing members of society.

The overwhelming success of PRIDE has proven what its founding leadership team suspected all along: When people are nourished by the power of purpose, and set up for success via well-designed training, their spirits soar, their talents blossom … and their disabilities disappear.

So, you can only imagine how I recently responded to a complaint voiced by an owner of multiple restaurants across the United States: “These young kids today can’t count change for our customers.” Look in the mirror, buddy, your lack of leadership is where the problem resides.

Business owners, leaders, managers and supervisors need to stop playing the victim card. It’s time to move from the excuses-laden, creativity-killing position of, “No, we can’t do that because,” to the possibilities-rich mindset of “Yes, If.”

Sandra would be the first to agree.

Doug Lipp is on a crusade to help your audience strengthen their corporate culture, boost business performance, and unapologetically, have fun while doing it. As an International Keynote Speaker, Best-selling Author of “Disney U”, Former Head of Disney University Training Team, and Executive Coach, Doug is one of the most trusted and respected business speakers and coaches in the world! He is sought after for his expertise in helping organizations build adaptive, world-class service cultures that fuel growth and long-term success. Doug leaves his audiences with a blueprint for creating and perpetuating a culture of significance unique to their organization.  Call 888-766-3155  today to hire Doug for your next event!

 

Are You Wishing for Remarkable Results?

Are You Wishing for Remarkable Results? Oliver Wendell Holmes once wrote, “Nothing is so common-place as to wish to be remarkable.”

Everyone wishes to be remarkable and every business wants remarkable results, but few ever experience it.

It is the wish – not the realization – that remains commonplace. This is because rather than look at the core of what drives the organization, most simply benchmark against the competition and constantly chase the behaviors of those who are best in class

We would all agree that behavior drives results. So it stands to reason that if you want to change the results you are getting, you have to change the behavior in order for it to lead to the desired results. results. It’s not quite that simple.

Behavior modification doesn’t often garner long-term results. Because behind every behavior is a belief system, a way of thinking. In remarkable companies that way of thinking is different – or should I say differentiating. Once this becomes apparent, training departments mount up efforts to instill the same knowledge base and drill the same competencies into their employees in the hopes that access to good information will do the trick. It doesn’t!

You cannot change someone’s way of thinking and resulting behavior without addressing the underlying core values. Simply stated, remarkable results come from a solid value system. People and organizations that produce remarkable results simply see and experience the world differently than those who have limited positive impact.

If you want to achieve remarkable results, the key is to identify, embrace and embody the core values that serve as the defining markers for the organization. And, I’m not talking about placing an aspirational value statement on a plaque in the lobby.

Once identified and articulated, then the organization must live out the values, hire to the values, teach the values and reinforce the values so that the defining values are constantly aligned. Aligned values will codify the belief system – or way of thinking – within the life of the organization. 

This all may sound a bit complex, but it actually is very simple. If you want to do more than be remarkable, then you must do two things well. If you do these two things well, everything else will be easy. If you miss it on these two points, I promise you everything else will be hard. The two things that you must do well to get remarkable results are:

  1. You must hire remarkable people, and…
  2. You must craft a remarkable culture.

Hiring remarkable people means hiring team members whose values align with those of the organization. Here is where most miss the mark. If you want to hire for values alignment, then you have to focus on values constructs. While past experience, education and references may be of some benefit, the most important factor is whether this hire will represent those values held dear by the organization. 

Crafting a remarkable culture must also be pursued with passion, because it is the single most important differentiating factor that any organization possesses.

Culture is simply the collective expression of the values, beliefs and behaviors that individuals bring to any endeavor. Wherever people gather, you are going to have a culture. The question is, “What kind of culture will your endeavor have?” You will either have a culture by design – where passion and intentionality prevail – or you will have a culture by default. The latter will most likely be an environment filled with lackluster performance, little creativity and a constant revolving door of talent.

But when you put remarkable people in a remarkable culture, you will certainly garner remarkable results. And remarkable teams are those whose values are aligned and drive the thinking and behavior of the organization.

Wishing for remarkable results is commonplace. If you want to go beyond wishing to realization, then you have to make the commitment to align values and Be Remarkable!

Dr. Randy Ross is the founder and CEO (Chief Enthusiasm Officer) of Remarkable!, sought-after International Keynote Speaker, Corporate Trainer, and Author of  the best-seller Remarkable!: Maximizing Results Through Value Creation. Want to be Remarkable!?  Dr. Randy Ross will show you how!!  To book Dr. Randy for your next event click here:   Book Dr. Randy Ross