Tag Archives: best leadership practices

It’s Work Positive Wednesday with Dr. Joey Faucette

3 Ways to Lead Positive in a World of Mutiny

 

mutiny

We’re talking about great leadership truths I discovered from Ed Friedman. The first one is that great leaders have “a capacity to separate themselves from the anxiety around them.” The second is that great leaders have “a commitment to goals beyond the horizons that everyone else saw.” The third one is great leaders have “the courage to define themselves within their community.”

This week we look at the fourth one which is great leaders have “the emotional stamina to persist in the face of mutinies.”

Anxiety drives those whom you lead to look short-range. Such a narrow focus creates fear within them. Fear causes mutinies. The very people you lead can revolt in fear and rather than following you, march off in all directions at once.

How do you discover the emotional stamina to persist in the face of such mutinies?

 

Here are 3 Ways to Lead Positive in a World of Mutiny:

 

Access Emotional Stamina

You have more strength within you than you realize. Think back over previous experiences when anxiety surrounded you, short-sightedness afflicted your vision, and fear paralyzed you. The people around you were leaving and just a few were left.

If you can remember it without a heart attack, you survived. You grew emotional stamina that is mature and tested.

Access it as you recall it. Feel it welling up within you.

Use it to face your current situation.

Advance with Persistence

Once you access your emotional stamina, you are equipped with the jet fuel that drives your success engine—persistence.

How many times have you said to a friend, “Hang in there!”?

That’s persistence. When they don’t answer your email, you call. When they don’t return it, you mail a card. When they offer no reply, you send a birthday greeting.

Your emotional stamina is strong enough to keep you moving forward toward your goal. You are equipped with persistence.

Use it. Hang in there, as I like to say, like an old, rusty fish hook.

Avoid Mutinies

Armed with your emotional stamina that fuels your success engine of persistence, you are ready to positively achieve. Your last challenge is to avoid those people on the team who would roll you under the bus just to cover their own anxiety, short-sightedness, and fear.

The way to Lead Positive and avoid mutinies is to starve them out. Avoid giving any of your emotions or thoughts to the Eeyore Vampires who say, “It can’t be done” and would suck you bone-dry of positive energy.

Attention is your most valuable emotional and mental asset. Divert all of your attention away from mutinies. Focus on how well you separated yourself from the anxiety, your deep commitment to the goals beyond the horizons that everyone else sees with the courage to define yourself within the community. These successful experiences turbocharge your emotional stamina which fuels your persistence.

Amaze yourself and those whom you lead by choosing to observe the mutiny without participating as you Work Positive!

 

JoeystandingWant to have Dr. Joey as your next 2014 keynote, seminar, or workshop presenter?
Contact Sue Falcone at sue@simplysuespeaks.com, or call 888-766-3155 today!

It’s Work Positive Wednesday with Dr. Joey Faucette

3 Ways to Lead Positive in an Anxious, Short-Sighted World

Visionary-leadershipLast week, I shared with you that Ed Friedman’s book, Generation to Generation, set my positive direction years ago. I discovered four great leadership truths from him. The first one we talked about is that great leaders have “a capacity to separate themselves from the anxiety around them.”

The second is that great leaders have “a commitment to goals beyond the horizons that everyone else saw.”

The anxious world drives leaders to short-sighted behavior in search of quick patch jobs to difficult challenges. How do you avoid such?

 

Here are 3 Ways to Lead Positive in an Anxious, Short-Sighted World:

 

Look Within

“Commitment to goals” requires you to first look within. Commitment is internal; a motivation that drives you to lead by certain core values and priorities regardless of the insanity of the world around you.

Think of your core values as your “Why?” and your priorities as your “What?” They anchor you regardless of the business climate. They emerge as commitment to goals—both personal and organizational. Such goals are the action plan expression of your “Why?” and “What?”

Look within and find your commitment to goals and lead from this internal strength.

 

Look Way Out

Anchored securely with your commitment to goals in mind, you Lead Positive next by looking way out, as Friedman puts it, “beyond the horizons.”

Anxiety at work pushes our heads to droop and our eyes to drop. We look down in a short-sighted attempt to find something we can control. It’s the classic “forest and trees” paradigm.

Positive leaders look up out of the status quo—literally “what a mess we’re in”—and scan the horizons for what’s approaching, to determine the corporate course headings, and set sail with commitment for the achievement of the next goal.

Look way out and Lead Positive up and out of the short-sighted that anxiety sees. Positive leaders are vision-focused.

 

Look Weird

Please understand that as you look within and look way out, you are going to look weird to others. Or, as Friedman puts it, “everyone else” sees something different so when you find your internal commitment to goals and cast a long-sighted vision, what you see and articulate is a stark contrast to mass thinking. Of course, it’s such mass thinking that oozes anxiety which results in short-sighted behavior and creates our current mess.

Know going in to Lead Positive that you’ll get lots of side glances, quizzical expressions, and whispers as you enter and exit rooms. Just accept it as proof-positive that your commitment-to-goals-beyond-the-horizons leadership is working positive!

 

JoeystandingWant to have Dr. Joey as your next 2014 keynote, seminar, or workshop presenter?
Contact Sue Falcone at sue@simplysuespeaks.com, or call 888-766-3155 today!

It’s Work Positive Wednesday with Dr. Joey Faucette

3 Ways to Lead Positive in an Anxious World

Ed Friedman was my mentor. His book, Generation to Generation, and his other works set my positive direction years ago. I discovered four great leadership truths from him. The first one is that great leaders have “a capacity to separate themselves from the anxiety around them.”

anxiety-at-workWe have an abundance of anxiety today at work, home, and everywhere really. How do you deal with it? And how do you Lead Positive with anxiety all around?

 

Here are 3 Ways to Lead Positive in an Anxious World:

 

Take a Breath

One of the best days of my life was when I learned I didn’t have to say everything I was thinking. My marriage improved. My work improved. My energy improved.

I’m very extroverted. So when an anxiety-dominated teammate, friend, or family member would spew all over me, I naturally wanted to fix it or straighten them out and spoke up immediately.

That rarely happened.

I learned to take a breath. To install a mental filter so I focus on the positive and filter out the negative. That one breath, strategically inhaled and exhaled, has helped me separate myself from the anxiety more times than I can count.

Just take a breath when anxiety appears.

Take the Long View

After you take a breath, ask yourself, “How much will this matter a year from now? Five years from now?

I am constantly amazed by how much anxiety is generated from situations that are more inconvenience than problem, more difficult than devastating, and more temporary than permanent.

Anxiety shoves the situation to the foreground when it probably belongs in the background. Another question I ask in such times is, “Any blood on the floor? Anybody having a stroke or heart attack?” Of course not. So I respond, “Okay, good. Now take a breath and slowly describe what’s going on.”

The situation is far less threatening when we take the long view.

Take Time Away

Every effective, positive leader I’ve ever known or read about made a regular habit of stepping away. Anxiety necessitates that you detox.

Taking time away allows you to lessen anxiety in the system rather than add to it because you focus on renewing your own capacity to separate from it. You act like a step-down transformer rather than a step-up one. You take 220 volts of anxiety down to 110 volts instead of amping 110 up to 220.

Rather than finding out how long you can absorb how many volts of anxiety, take some time away. Go to a movie, for a walk, or a long weekend, or even better—a vacation! Renew your emotional stamina to take a breath and take the long view when you take time away.

Lead Positive and separate yourself from the anxiety around you as you Work Positive today!

 

JoeystandingWant to have Dr. Joey as your next 2014 keynote, seminar, or workshop presenter?
Contact Sue Falcone at sue@simplysuespeaks.com, or call 888-766-3155 today!